What's On at Zealandia


 

Research

Five ways nature improves your wellbeing

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We have all heard it—spending time in nature can improve your health.  

Western science is finally catching up with what Māori and many other knowledge systems have always known. People are part of nature, and being separated from it affects our health. 

Zealandia researchers have had leading roles in new discoveries about how nature improves our health.  

Here are five ways through which reconnecting with nature can improve your wellbeing...

Conservation in Cities. What Motivates Participation?

By Christopher Woolley

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Research into what makes people want to take part in different nature-based activities improves our ability to design projects that will engage large numbers of participants from diverse backgrounds. This is important to ensure that projects benefit from sufficient engagement to make them effective, as well as ensuring that projects are generally accessible and appealing. Research from Zealandia's Centre for People and Nature published in the journal People and Nature, examined how different backyard conservation activities appeal to different sorts of people in Aotearoa New Zealand, and what motivates participation.

Will they stay or will they shag off?

Kāruhiruhi and the lower reservoir restoration

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Written by Chris Gee (volunteer and boat skipper) and Ellen Irwin (Lead Ranger, Conservation)

In 2021, Zealandia Te Māra a Tāne carried out a project to restore the mouri and water quality of the lower reservoir, Roto Kawau. As part of this project, the water level of the reservoir was lowered by six metres, creating an expanse of bare, fractured mud. An important aspect at the beginning of this whole project was implementing a wildlife hazard management plan to identify any specific hazards to Zealandia species presented by the lower reservoir operation, and to consider mitigation approaches where necessary. This article discusses how the kawau/shag species reacted to the lowering water level. 

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