NEWS


 

Zealandia turns 21

This story originally appeared in Forest & Bird. Written by Jim Lynch.

Kate Miller

As Wellington’s Zealandia celebrates its 21st birthday, sanctuary founder Jim Lynch reflects on what has been achieved and lessons learned along the way.

Interview with Alison Russell-French

We had a chat to the President of Canberra's Woodlands and Wetlands Trust.

Kate Miller

Our sister sanctuary in Australia is Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary. Located in Canberra, Mulligans Flat is home to native Australian bandicoots, bettongs, mice, a variety of birds and other wildlife. They have a fence similar to that of ZEALANDIA's, except it is designed especially to keep cats, rabbits and foxes at bay. 

Find out from Alison Russell-French, President of the Trust, about the challenges and successes of this very different, yet very similar, wildlife sanctuary. 

Hairy-lobed hangehange

look closely and a small world appears

Ali McDonald

Introducing hangehange (Geniostoma ligustrifolium) – this small, pale flower may seem all too easy to miss… but not for our native flies, who happen to be very attracted to pale green! 

Get on track with Alfie Kākā

If fresh air and exercise is your thing, then the track team might be your calling

Alfie Kākā

I’ve just met some of Zealandia’s track team. I didn’t know what to expect really. Some kind of experts in running jumping and throwing things maybe? But I quickly found out that while mountain biking and walking were involved, so were lopping, sawing and digging. Track maintenance is their game, and there are two teams, mid-week and weekend.

Kōtukutuku flowers

the colour of efficiency

Ali McDonald

Have you ever noticed how kōtukutuku - our native tree fuchsia (Fuchsia excorticata) - produces flowers of two different colours? This is because it colour-codes its petals to allow for maximum pollination efficiency.

Heritage Dams

Rosemary Cole

On earlier visitor maps,  ZEALANDIA`s Lower Dam was referred to as The Lower Lake and the Upper Dam as the Upper Lake. Originally, however, The Lower Dam was named The Lower Reservoir, which was an earth dam completed in 1878. Due to the European settlers wanting farmland, large fires in 1850 and 1860 cleared that area of its broadleaf forest. Some of the valley was farmed uptil 1906, then any remaining catchment area was bought for waterworks.

Matariki from a Historical Perspective

Rosemary Cole

Historically, te reo Māori was an oral language and Matariki (Māori New Year) was a time when knowledge was shared orally, as in reciting whakapapa (family trees). Matariki was also a time when legends were passed on orally.

One such legend is about Tāne-mahuta – the guardian spirit of the forest and the god of light. He pushed Rangi-nui (Sky Father) and Papa-tū-ā-nuku (Earth Mother) apart, so that he and his brothers had more light and space. One of Tāne-mahuta’s many brothers was Tāwhiri-mātea, the god of wind and storms. Tāwhiri-mātea was angry about his parents being forcibly separated and cried seven tears that became the seven stars of Matariki.

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