BLOG


 

Wellington is becoming a global leader as we learn to live with nature

Dr Danielle Shanahan 0 6471

Our nation’s capital is being celebrated as ‘an ecological triumph’ (National Geographic January 2018)—Wellington is one of the only cities in the world where the diversity of native birds is increasing. This change has been driven by the establishment of ZEALANDIA 22 years ago, the 225 ha sanctuary for wildlife just 3 km from downtown Wellington. 

Older and wiser? Foraging in adult and juvenile hihi

Research by PhD Student Vix Franks

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary 0 2486

Young animals face many challenges when they become independent from their parents. One problem is they need to find food, but have little experience to help them. Even human teenagers can struggle when there’s no one else around to do the shopping, and for wild animals, making the best foraging decisions is even more crucial for their survival. During my PhD I’m investigating how juvenile birds overcome this challenge.

Wellington BEANZ Workshop

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary 0 2448

On the 24th of November, 65 biology teachers from the Wellington region gathered at ZEALANDIA for the Biology Educators Association of New Zealand (BEANZ) Workshop. The event provided a forum for teachers to build connections, share resources and insights, discuss the direction of the curriculum and hear from educators and scientists working in and around ZEALANDIA.

Sanctuary to Sea

Kia Mauriora te Kaiwharawhara

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary 0 8054

ZEALANDIA’s first 20 years was all about focusing on the land within our pioneering predator-proof fence, and what a success this has been. The valley now harbours a rich habitat for many birds, lizards, and invertebrates, and our vegetation is now thriving. This achievement wouldn’t have been possible without the generosity of a huge range of volunteers, members, staff and donors that have supported the project along the way.

The "Halley's comet" of the plant world is flowering at ZEALANDIA

Heketara (Olearia rani) is flowering profusely at ZEALANDIA this spring

Alfie Kākā 0 3249

Frothy white-capped trees scattered across the western scarp have captured people's attention this spring - but what are they? According to plant enthusiast Pam Fuller, they are heketara (Olearia rani) - a type of tree daisy - that flowers only every three years or so at ZEALANDIA.

Four Reasons to Vote Tīeke for Bird of the Year

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary 0 4686

Forest & Bird’s famous Bird of the Year poll is back again, and this year some of the ZEALANDIA crew are throwing their weight behind the plucky little wattle bird: tīeke (saddleback). Perhaps you love all birds too much? Maybe you're not into birds at all. Whatever the case, here are a few handy reminders why tīeke should be Bird of the Year!

Wellington's new takahē

We're soon welcoming a breeding pair of takahē to the sanctuary!

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary 0 6456

You will have heard our exciting news about the two takahē that will be making their way to ZEALANDIA on 28 August 2017!

Nio and Orbell are a breeding pair of takahē, 14 and 17 years old respectively. There is every possibility they could nest at ZEALANDIA this summer, which is incredible news for Wellington and ZEALANDIA’s ongoing success in conservation.

Why we don’t sell kākā food

An explanation from ZEALANDIA Conservation Manager, Dr. Danielle Shanahan

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary 0 9270

After being pretty much lost from the area in the early 1900’s, kākā are well and truly back in Wellington. Hundreds of them have been banded since they were introduced at ZEALANDIA in 2002. However, as these raucous parrots adapt to an urban environment, we need to be mindful of a few issues, including feeding kākā.

RSS
First45678101213

Theme picker