NEWS


 

Wellington's new takahē

We're soon welcoming a breeding pair of takahē to the sanctuary!

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary

You will have heard our exciting news about the two takahē that will be making their way to ZEALANDIA on 28 August 2017!

Nio and Orbell are a breeding pair of takahē, 14 and 17 years old respectively. There is every possibility they could nest at ZEALANDIA this summer, which is incredible news for Wellington and ZEALANDIA’s ongoing success in conservation.

Why we don’t sell kākā food

An explanation from ZEALANDIA Conservation Manager, Dr. Danielle Shanahan

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary

After being pretty much lost from the area in the early 1900’s, kākā are well and truly back in Wellington. Hundreds of them have been banded since they were introduced at ZEALANDIA in 2002. However, as these raucous parrots adapt to an urban environment, we need to be mindful of a few issues, including feeding kākā.

Trustee Changes

Welcomes and Farewells

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary

Karori Sanctuary Trust has welcomed Pete Monk on to the Trust Board. Pete brings to the Trust a wide range of tourism and marketing skills and experience from the commercial and community sectors.

 

Pete replaces long standing trustee Pam Fuller, whose dedicated service was recognised with a Karori Sanctuary Trust honorary membership at her board farewell in July.   Pam remains an active volunteer at ZEALANDIA.

 

The Road Gang

Louise Slocombe

Michael McBryde, Paul Kitteridge, Ian Appleton and Alan Perry call themselves the ‘road gang’. They are members of ZEALANDIA’s Wednesday working group – a group that meets every Wednesday morning  to carry out a wide range of maintenance tasks.

Happy Housewarming!

Juvenile tuatara released back to 'wild'

Rosemary Cole

“ If you go out in [ZEALANDIA] today, you`re sure of a big surprise “, because there are no juvenile tuatara in their former glass nursery. Six juvenile tuatara were judged to have grown big enough to cope in the wild. They were also judged to be healthy, so were moved into the wild to protect them from a fungal disease primarily affecting tuatara in captivity.

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