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NEWS


 

Wellington is becoming a global leader as we learn to live with nature

Dr Danielle Shanahan

Our nation’s capital is being celebrated as ‘an ecological triumph’ (National Geographic January 2018)—Wellington is one of the only cities in the world where the diversity of native birds is increasing. This change has been driven by the establishment of ZEALANDIA 22 years ago, the 225 ha sanctuary for wildlife just 3 km from downtown Wellington. 

Native fish surveying

Restoring ZEALANDIA's waterways

Dr Danielle Shanahan

ZEALANDIA has a 500-year vision of restoration, and our lakes offer a unique challenge in this respect. They are man-made, and restoring them to the state they were in before the dams went up is not really an option. As a result, we are now aiming to create healthy, functioning lake ecosystems here in the heart of Wellington.

Sanctuary to Sea

Kia Mauriora te Kaiwharawhara

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary

ZEALANDIA’s first 20 years was all about focusing on the land within our pioneering predator-proof fence, and what a success this has been. The valley now harbours a rich habitat for many birds, lizards, and invertebrates, and our vegetation is now thriving. This achievement wouldn’t have been possible without the generosity of a huge range of volunteers, members, staff and donors that have supported the project along the way.

Freshwater Citizen Science at ZEALANDIA

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary

On 18th November 2017, Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) run its first Freshwater Citizen Science workshop aimed at community groups. This workshop was held in ZEALANDIA as part of its new project, Sanctuary to Sea. Around 40 people from all ages and from various locations around the Wellington region, including Kaiwharawhara water catchment, Owhiro and Waiwhetu streams, attended this instructive and fun event.

Wellington's new takahē

We're soon welcoming a breeding pair of takahē to the sanctuary!

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary

You will have heard our exciting news about the two takahē that will be making their way to ZEALANDIA on 28 August 2017!

Nio and Orbell are a breeding pair of takahē, 14 and 17 years old respectively. There is every possibility they could nest at ZEALANDIA this summer, which is incredible news for Wellington and ZEALANDIA’s ongoing success in conservation.

Why we don’t sell kākā food

An explanation from ZEALANDIA Conservation Manager, Dr. Danielle Shanahan

ZEALANDIA Ecosanctuary

After being pretty much lost from the area in the early 1900’s, kākā are well and truly back in Wellington. Hundreds of them have been banded since they were introduced at ZEALANDIA in 2002. However, as these raucous parrots adapt to an urban environment, we need to be mindful of a few issues, including feeding kākā.

Happy Housewarming!

Juvenile tuatara released back to 'wild'

Rosemary Cole

“ If you go out in [ZEALANDIA] today, you`re sure of a big surprise “, because there are no juvenile tuatara in their former glass nursery. Six juvenile tuatara were judged to have grown big enough to cope in the wild. They were also judged to be healthy, so were moved into the wild to protect them from a fungal disease primarily affecting tuatara in captivity.

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